Wings of the Wind, by Connilyn Cossette

book cover Wings of the WindPublisher’s Overview:

Can vengeance give way to forgiveness when one woman’s destiny becomes entangled with the very enemies she sought to destroy?

Motherless and raised alongside her brothers, Alanah, a Canaanite, is no stranger to fighting. When her father and brothers are killed in battle with the Hebrews, she disguises herself and sneaks onto the battlefield to avenge her family. The one thing she never counted on was surviving.

Tobiah, a Hebrew warrior, has spent his share of time on the battlefield and is shocked to find an unconscious woman among the casualties. Compelled to bring her to a healer back at the Hebrew camp, he’s unprepared for the consequences of what he intended as an act of compassion.

In order to survive, Alanah must unite with her enemy. But will a terrible revelation drive her toward an even greater danger?

First Thoughts:

I chose to read this book because it followed on from Counted With the Stars and Shadow of the Storm. It does, however, appear to be set much later in the Exodus, and I’m wondering how much commonality there will be between the books.

My Take:

Wings of the Wind is one of those Biblically-based novels that reminds me how little I really know the Old Testament. I didn’t know about many of the battles they faced, and my eyes have often glazed over the various rules by which they were expected to abide. The premise of this novel is that Tobiah is compelled to marry the female warrior he captures on the battlefield. On the one hand, marrying a captured woman was permissible according to Deuteronomy 21 but, on the other, it would’ve been forbidden according to Deuteronomy 7 since Alanah was a Canaanite. I’m still slightly confused, but Connilyn Cossette seems to have taken a middle ground by describing Alanah as a Canaanite who had no faith in the Canaanite gods and hated the pagan rituals of her people.

This is the final book in the Out From Egypt series and takes place approximately 37 years after the previous two. The majority of characters are new, but it was good to see at least one familiar figure. It isn’t necessary to read the series in chronological order, but I’d suggest doing so anyway. It does follow the Biblical narrative of the Israelites’ time in the wilderness, as described in Numbers 21 and Joshua chapters two through six. There are mentions of God providing fresh water and manna, of their growing boredom of His provision, of Korah’s rebellion and fate, the various battles fought, and the vital action around the walls of Jericho. And, not to spoil things too much, but I was surprised to see Cossette weave another important Biblical figure into the story. It isn’t so much that the character appears, but how they feature.

While I don’t think Wings of the Wind is the best book in this trilogy it is, nevertheless, a good read. The young Hebrew woman, Moriyah, becomes a sympathetic character in the novel and I closed the book wanting to know what happened to her. The good news for me is that it looks as though she’ll appear as the main character in a new book by Cossette next year.

Thank you to Bethany House for my complimentary copy of Wings of the Wind, which I received in exchange for my honest review.

Have you read Wings of the Wind? Do you plan to read it? Let me know your thoughts.

Excerpt

Publisher: Bethany House (a division of Baker Publishing)

Publication Date: 02 May 2017

Page Count: 352

Read more on:   Connilyn Cossette’s Website  Bethany House’s Website

Purchase on:   Amazon   Barnes & Noble   Books-a-million   Christianbook.com

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