Many Sparrows, by Lori Benton

book coverPublisher’s Overview:

Either she and her children would emerge from that wilderness together, or none of them would…

In 1774, the Ohio-Kentucky frontier pulses with rising tension and brutal conflicts as Colonists push westward and encroach upon Native American territories. The young Inglesby family is making the perilous journey west when an accident sends Philip back to Redstone Fort for help, forcing him to leave his pregnant wife Clare and their four-year old son Jacob on a remote mountain trail.

When Philip does not return and Jacob disappears from the wagon under the cover of darkness, Clare awakens the next morning to find herself utterly alone, in labor and wondering how she can to recover her son…especially when her second child is moments away from being born.

Clare will face the greatest fight of her life, as she struggles to reclaim her son from the Shawnee Indians now holding him captive. But with the battle lines sharply drawn, Jacob’s life might not be the only one at stake. When frontiersman Jeremiah Ring comes to her aid, can the stranger convince Clare that recovering her son will require the very thing her anguished heart is unwilling to do—be still, wait and let God fight this battle for them?

First Thoughts:

This is the first time I’ve read a novel by Lori Benton. I’m not sure what to expect, although I’ve seen positive reviews of her previous books.

My Take:

Many Sparrows starts in the immediate aftermath of the Yellow Creek Massacre which took place on the banks of the upper Ohio River. A quick bit of research told me that this was a precursor to Lord Dunmore’s War, which I’d heard of but never really knew much about. Shame on me, for these events took place in one of my favorite parts of this country. In fact, I’d not heard of Redstone Fort, once located in southwestern Pennsylvania, before picking up this book.

In alternating points of view, we get the stories of Clare and Jeremiah’s pasts. We get to meet Philip Inglesby before his untimely death, and his attitudes and behavior provoke sympathy for Clare. A third voice is introduced in the second half of the book, with the introduction of Clare’s uncle. Alphus Litchfield will fight on the side of the white men at the pivotal Battle of Point Pleasant. It is through his perspective that the reader learns of the events happening in other parts of the country that will lead to revolution.

Clare is a mother on a mission. With her husband gone forever, she’s determined to salvage the rest of her family. Her faith is shattered: how can she believe in a God who has caused such pain? She finds surprising common ground with an Indian woman who has also experienced loss, a connection that will prove fruitful if she’s willing to trust and wait.

Many Sparrows is a fascinating look at frontier life in the run up to the American Revolution. It shows how relationships and communities can grow and then be torn apart by misunderstanding and anger. There are no clearly defined enemies, except in the historic battle, and there are many Indians and whites in it who try to bridge the divide between their people to stop the fighting and killing. This is a novel that truly tugged at my heartstrings and I actually think my life is better for having read it.

Thank you to Waterbrook Press and Litfuse Publicity for my complimentary copy of Many Sparrows, which I received in exchange for my honest review.

This review is part of a Litfuse Publicity Book Tour

Have you read Many Sparrows? Do you plan to read it? Let me know your thoughts.


Publisher: Waterbrook Press

Publication Date: 29 August 2017

Page Count: 400

Read more on:   Lori Benton’s Website   Waterbrook’s Website

Purchase on:   Amazon   Barnes & Noble   Books-a-million

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