The Captain’s Daughter, by Jennifer Delamere

book cover The Captain's DaughterPublisher’s Overview:

London, 1879

Forced to Leave All She Loves Behind, She Seeks a New Life in a City Bursting with Opportunity, But Fraught with Danger

When a series of circumstances beyond her control leaves Rosalyn Bernay alone and penniless in London, she chances upon a job backstage at a theater putting on the most popular show in the city. A talented musician and singer, she feels immediately at home and soon becomes enthralled with the idea of pursuing a career on the stage. That is, as long as the shadows from her past don’t catch up with her.

After a hand injury forces Nate Moran from his army regiment in India, he returns home to London, a place that holds bitter memories. He agrees to fill in temporarily as a stagehand while his brother recuperates from a broken leg, but Nate is counting down the days until he can rejoin his regiment. His future is decided–until he meets a beautiful woman who has found a new lease on life in the very place Nate yearns to leave behind.

First Thoughts:

This is the first in a new London-based series by an author I don’t recall reading before.

My Take:

Let me first say that, although I don’t usually judge books by their covers, I love the back cover of The Captain’s Daughter. It’s of a rural English station made of brick and there’s a steam train pulling in. Growing up in Britain, I did a lot of traveling by train and that illustration took me right back to some of the stations on my journeys.

The cover isn’t the only aspect of this novel that grabbed me. It was delightful to find light opera composers Gilbert and Sullivan within its pages. The plot features HMS Pinafore and includes the debut performance of The Pirates of Penzance. Members of Pinafore’s cast become Rosalyn’s friends. As far as I can tell, the story stays close to known historical facts about Gilbert and Sullivan’s productions, including a copyright performance of Pirates with which Rosalyn gets involved.

I found The Captain’s Daughter difficult to put down. Yes, I was frustrated by the love triangle in it because I wanted Rosalyn to wake up but that just made me want to continue reading. It’s a great start to a new series and I’m looking forward to reading the next book when it comes out.

Thank you to Litfuse Publicity and Bethany House for my complimentary copy of The Captain’s Daughter, which I received in exchange for my honest review.

This review is part of a Litfuse Publicity Book Tour

Have you read The Captain’s Daughter? Do you plan to read it? Let me know your thoughts.

Excerpt

Publisher: Bethany House (a division of Baker Publishing)

Publication Date: 28 February 2017

Page Count: 352

Read more on:   Jennifer Delamere’s Website   Bethany House’s Website

Purchase on:   Amazon   Barnes & Noble   Books-a-million   Christianbook.com

Behind the Scenes, by Jen Turano

book cover Behind the ScenesPublisher’s Overview:

After spending the last six years banished to the wallflower section of the ballroom, Miss Permilia Griswold has finally figured out a way to pass the time at all the New York high-society events she attends. Under the pseudonym “Miss Quill,” she is the author of society gossip columns filled with tidbits only an insider in society–albeit one on the fringes–would know. 

When she overhears a threat against Mr. Asher Rutherford, the owner of one of the most up-and-coming department stores in the city, she’s determined to warn him. But the irritatingly handsome man doesn’t believe her, leaving her no choice but to take matters into her own hands. What she doesn’t anticipate is that she’ll end up putting herself at risk in the process–or that she and Mr. Rutherford, a man with secrets of his own, just might end up joining forces after all.

First Thoughts:

I’ve enjoyed every book I’ve read by Jen Turano. It was a no-brainer, therefore, to request to review this title when Bethany House made it available. Plus, I’d already read the free prequel novella.

My Take:

You always know what you’re going to get with a Jen Turano novel. It’s usually set in New York City during the Gilded Age (or, on occasion, Newport, Rhode Island) and includes a bunch of quirky characters of various ages and social status, sometimes interacting with real life figures of that era. There’s mystery and intrigue wrapped up in a comedy of errors and, of course, there’s romance. The writing is light but also contains semi-formal language. Turano’s characters are almost always introduced for the first time as either Miss or Mister. Polite society should always perform proper introductions, after all. Despite this apparent formula, however, Turano always delivers a fresh and delightful story.

Behind the Scenes starts at the notorious Vanderbilt costume ball of 1883, and over 100 pages of plot development are set there. Run a search for this event online and you’ll find plenty of photographs of society’s elite in various forms of fancy dress, some of which Turano describes. This was a time of excess and main character Permilia is often scolded in the book by her stepmother for her seemingly frugal ways. Despite the humor, incredulous costumes and hair-raising escapades through Central Park, however, there’s a serious note about the changing nature of celebrity gossip and how charming society columns became the front page exposes of today. Miss Quill’s writings harken back to a more innocent time.

Behind the Scenes kicks off Turano’s newest series, titled Apart From the Crowd. Early on in this novel, there’s a reference to events and characters in a series e-prequel novella. It’s worth reading if you can because it does introduce Permilia and Asher. It’s called At Your Request and I believe it’s permanently free. Meanwhile, I’m eagerly looking forward to the next release, which apparently features a wealthy society matron who appears to take a liking to other people’s property…

Thank you to Bethany House for my complimentary copy of Behind the Scenes, which I received in exchange for my honest review.

Have you read Behind the Scenes? Do you plan to read it? Let me know your thoughts.

Excerpt

Author Q & A

Publisher: Bethany House (a division of Baker Publishing)

Publication Date: 18 April 2017

Page Count: 352

Read more on:   Jen Turano’s Website   Bethany House’s Website

Purchase on:   Amazon   Barnes & Noble   Books-a-million   Christianbook.com

To the Farthest Shores, by Elizabeth Camden

book coverPublisher’s Overview:

The unpredictability of her upbringing prepared army nurse Jenny Bennett to face any challenge at the Presidio Army base, but the sudden reappearance in her life of the dashing naval officer who broke her heart six years ago is enough to rattle even her. 

Lieutenant Ryan Gallagher is one of the few men in the world qualified to carry out a daring government mission overseas–an assignment that destroyed his reputation and broke the heart of the only woman he ever loved. Honor-bound never to reveal where he was during those years, he can’t tell Jenny the truth, or it will endanger an ongoing mission and put thousands of lives at risk.

Ryan thinks he may have finally found a solution to his impossible situation, but he needs Jenny’s help. While her loyalty to her country compels her to agree, she was too badly hurt to fall for Ryan again despite his determination to win her back. When an unknown threat from Ryan’s past puts everything at risk–including his life–can they overcome the seemingly insurmountable odds stacked against them in time?

First Thoughts:

Give me an Elizabeth Camden novel and I’ll read it. I’ve enjoyed every book of hers that I’ve read.

My Take:

To the Farthest Shores is a novel about cultivating pearls, Japanese social graces, and a woman trying to compete with a ghost. Ryan Gallagher returns from an extended mission in Asia with a young daughter and a mountain of mystery surrounding him. Other soldiers call him a coward and vandalize his home but, even though he abandoned her, Jenny stands up for him without knowing where he was or what he was doing. When he asks for her nursing skills to assist a colleague, she agrees but is canny enough to add a few conditions to the assignment. Her adoptive father joins the small group in a remote coastal town, where Ryan is attempting to perfect the art of cultivating pearls.

Although I’m a fan of Elizabeth Camden, this won’t go down as one of my favorite novels by her. I didn’t care much for the two main characters. I’d have been okay if it hadn’t had the required happy ending. The supporting characters were more interesting: Ryan’s daughter was a sweetie, Jenny’s father was intriguing, and I wouldn’t mind another story about Ryan’s colleague, Finn. I also had a problem with so much of the back story being told in block paragraphs. Flashback scenes might’ve appealed to me more. I did, however, learn what a cultured pearl is after having heard the term for so long. I also doubt this’ll be the last Elizabeth Camden book I’ll read. I’m sure I’ll read A Dangerous Legacy when it comes out in October.

Thank you to Bethany House for my complimentary copy of To the Farthest Shores, which I received in exchange for my honest review.

Have you read To the Farthest Shores? Do you plan to read it? Let me know your thoughts.

Excerpt

Author Q & A

Publisher: Bethany House (a division of Baker Publishing)

Publication Date: 04 April 2017

Page Count: 336

Read more on:   Elizabeth Camden’s Website   Bethany House’s Website

Purchase on:   Amazon   Barnes & Noble   Books-a-million   Christianbook.com