Saffire, by Sigmund Brouwer

book coverPublisher’s Overview:

For President Teddy Roosevelt, controlling the east-west passage between two oceans mattered so much that he orchestrated a revolution to control it. His command was to ‘let the dirt fly’ and for years, the American Zone of the Panama Canal mesmerized the world, working in uneasy co-existence with the Panamanian aristocrats.

It’s in this buffered Zone where, in 1909, James Holt begins to protect a defenseless girl named Saffire, expecting a short and simple search for her mother. Instead it draws him away from safety, into a land haunted by a history of pirates, gold runners, and plantation owners, all leaving behind ghosts of their interwoven desires sins and ambitions, ghosts that create the web of deceit and intrigue of a new generation of revolutionary politics.  It will also bring him together with a woman who will change his course—or bring an end to it.

First Thoughts:

While I’ve heard of Sigmund Brouwer I’ve not read any of his previous novels. I’m intrigued by this novel because of the plot information and the exotic setting. I’m not sure I’ve ever read anything set around the building of the Panama Canal.

My Take:

James Holt is sent to Panama as a favor to an old friend. He doesn’t know the reason for the trip but plans to spend no more than 24 hours in the fledgling country. A chance meeting persuades him to stay marginally longer, but he regrets every minute spent away from his North Dakota ranch. Little does he know a perfunctory search for a missing woman will turn into a dangerous investigation into sabotage and political intrigue. After a nasty run in with the National Police, Holt isn’t sure who else he can trust besides the unassuming clerk T.B. Miskimon.

The plot of Saffire is complicated at times, with several twists and turns. Some clues are easy enough to piece together while other information has to almost be forced from the pages. There’s a multinational cast of characters from the eponymous Saffire to the aforementioned Miskimon, but I found it difficult to remember who some of the minor characters were in relation to the plot and each other. I couldn’t work out how old Saffire was: I get the feeling she was younger than she appeared. Miskimon is introduced as being “prissy” but he grew on me and reminded me of a mix of Bertie Wooster’s Jeeves and Batman’s Alfred. I was surprised to later learn this particular clerk was an historical character. He’s not the only historical figure to appear in the book either.

Saffire is a fascinating portrayal of America’s Panama exploits, with plenty of detail of life in the Canal Zone. There’s also something about it that I can’t quite describe, a certain je ne sais pas if you will. The one aspect I didn’t care for was the romance, which could’ve been left out in my opinion. Overall, Saffire isn’t a mind blowing book but it is one I enjoyed reading.

Thank you to Blogging for Books for my complimentary uncorrected proof of Saffire.

Have you read Saffire? Do you plan to read it? Let me know your thoughts.


Publisher: Waterbrook (an imprint of Penguin Random House)

Publication Date: 16 August 2016

Page Count: 336

Read more on:   Sigmund Brouwer’s Website   Waterbrook’s Website

Purchase on:   Amazon   Barnes & Noble   Books-a-million

Miriam, by Mesu Andrews

book coverPublisher’s Overview:

The Hebrews call me prophetess, the Egyptians a seer.
But I am neither. I am simply a watcher of Israel 
and the messenger of El Shaddai.
When He speaks to me in dreams, I interpret. When He whispers a melody, I sing.

At eighty-six, Miriam had devoted her entire life to loving El Shaddai and serving His people as both midwife and messenger. Yet when her brother Moses returns to Egypt from exile, he brings a disruptive message. God has a new name – Yahweh – and has declared a radical deliverance for the Israelites.

Miriam and her beloved family face an impossible choice: cling to familiar bondage or embrace uncharted freedom at an unimaginable cost. Even if the Hebrews survive the plagues set to turn the Nile to blood and unleash a maelstrom of frogs and locusts, can they weather the resulting fury of the Pharaoh?

Enter an exotic land where a cruel Pharaoh reigns, pagan priests wield black arts, and the Israelites cry out to a God they only think they know.

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Room for Hope, by Kim Vogel Sawyer

book coverPublisher’s Overview:

In a desperate time, can Neva find forgiveness for a grievous wrong—and make room for hope?

Neva Shilling has a heavy load of responsibility while her husband travels to neighboring communities and sells items from his wagon. In his absence, she faithfully runs the Shilling Mercantile, working to keep their business strong as the Depression takes its toll, and caring for their twins.

When a wagon pulls up after supper, Neva and her children rush out—and into the presence of the deputy driving a wagon carrying three young children. The deputy shocks her with the news that Warren and his wife have died, insisting it was their last request that the three children go live with “Aunt Neva.”

Neva’s heart is shattered as she realizes that Warren’s month-long travels were excuses for visits with his secret family. She wants nothing more than to forget Warren, but can she abandon these innocent children to an orphanage? Yet if she takes them in, will she ever be able to see them as more than evidence of her husband’s betrayal and love them the way God does?

Continue reading for my thoughts on this beautiful novel and also for an excerpt from it.

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